Black Country Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

We provide a full and comprehensive range of services by working in a discrete but supportive manner. The services are provided by a dedicated and skilled workforce across various sites in the Borough, in the community and in people’s homes.

The Trust delivers its services through two service directorates, namely the Adult and Older Adult Mental Health Services Directorate and the Specialist Services Directorate, incorporating Learning Disability Services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Substance Misuse.

 

In line with the Transforming Care Programme, the Black Country Partnership NHS Trust aims to provide 3 tiers of Learning Disability Services which work alongside Primary Care services to provide a Black Country wide 4-Tier service provision for people who have a learning disability.

The purpose of the 4-Tier service ensures clinical care and treatment is focused on care in the community, with less emphasis and/or reliance on inpatient services.

The 4-Tier approach enables patients to receive care at the point of their greatest need. In practice this means patients may move up and down the 4-Tiers of service dependant on their needs at any point in time.

Table 1: Learning Disability Services 4 -Tier provision of care

ld tier provision of care


These services provide specialist health care to adults with learning disabilities and additional complex health needs in Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton. These health needs can include autistic spectrum disorders, mental health difficulties and behaviour problems.

Teams of specialist health staff from different professions provide a range of in-patient, outpatient and community treatments and interventions. Our specialist healthcare staff work closely with other agencies such as  social workers to ensure seamless and comprehensive care.

You can read a short description of our in-patient and community-based provision by clicking on the links below.

 

Community Services

Tier 2 – Locality based Community Learning Disability Teams (CLDT’s)

We have four Community Learning Disability Teams (CLDT’s) for adults who have a learning disability – 1 team located in each of the four boroughs of the Black Country (Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton).

Our Community Learning Disability Teams aim to provide a flexible, proactive, co-ordinated and integrated service for people over 18 years of age who have a diagnosed learning disability, are unable to access mainstream health services effectively and/or require access to a specialist health team.

Please click on the links below for specific locality team information:

Dudley Community Learning Disability Team

Walsall Community Learning Disability Team

Wolverhampton Community Learning Disability Team

Sandwell Community Learning Disability Team

 

Tier 3 - Black Country Wide Community Teams

Intensive Support Team (IST)

The Community Intensive Support Team aims to provide a flexible, proactive, co-ordinated and integrated service for people over 18 years of age who have a diagnosed learning disability, are unable to access mainstream services effectively and/or require a specialist intervention team.

In summary the service enables:

  • The highest level of independence possible, in the least restrictive way.
  • Prevention and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalisation.
  • Facilitation of timely discharge from hospital inpatient care.
  • Development of early detection systems alongside community teams and timely responses with early interventions on referral.
  • An intensive response to crisis.
  • Multi-disciplinary collaborative input to assess and develop a formulation especially in relation to behaviours that challenge.
  • Planning of strategies, alongside the community teams, to prevent future crises.
  • Signposting and navigation of assessment of need for family carers to help support them with the demands of caring during periods of crisis.
  • Provision of timely and accessible intervention to patients experiencing psychiatric, psycho-social, behavioural and/or pharmacological problems.


Forensic Community Team (FCT)


The Forensic Community Team aims to provide a flexible, proactive, co-ordinated and integrated service for people over 18 years of age who have a diagnosed learning disability, who are either subject to the criminal justice system, or at significant risk of becoming so, are unable to access mainstream services effectively and/or require a specialist forensic team.

In summary the service enables:

  • Provision of timely and accessible intervention to people with a learning disability who have active and ongoing forensic and psychiatric, psycho-social, behavioural or pharmacological needs including consultation to the people who support them.
  • Promotion of the qualities and values of the ‘Good Lives Model (GLM) - a framework of offender rehabilitation’
  • Provision of the highest level of independence possible, in the least restrictive way.
  • Prevention and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalisation.
  • Facilitation of timely discharge from hospital inpatient forensic care.
  • Signposting and navigation of assessment of need for family carers to help support them with the demands of caring and involvement with the criminal justice system.


Tier 4 - In-patient Services

Gerry Simon Clinic
This is a regional low secure service for men with learning disabilities and complex health needs, some of whom may have come into contact with the criminal justice system. This unit is based at the Heath Lane hospital site in West Bromwich.

Penrose House
This is a specialist learning disability acute assessment and treatment service for both men and women. Separate male and female facilities are available. This unit is based at the Heath Lane hospital site in West Bromwich.

The Larches
This is a specialist step-down and rehabilitation service for men with learning disabilities and complex health needs, many of whom have been discharged from a secure environment. This unit is based at the Hallam Street hospital site in West Bromwich.

We have a number of therapy services in the Trust. They play a key part in the care and support we provide to people.

A brief description of who the services support and how can be found below, and you can read more about them all by clicking on the link to their individual pages.

Counselling Service – We have three Counselling Services, covering Oldbury and Smethwick, Wednesbury and West Bromwich, and Rowley Regis and Tipton. Each service gives support to people aged 18 and over with a variety of emotional difficulties. The services offer specialist support for South Asian and African-Caribbean clients who wish to talk with a worker who has specialist cultural and language skills. Counselling can be provided in Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, and Bengali. Counselling gives someone a safe space to discuss and explore their concerns and feelings.

Family Therapy – This team work as part of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (or CAMHS), supporting children and young people, and the families of children and young people, who have complex mental health needs. Family therapy is a way of working with families so they can understand and deal better with problems that family members may be going through.

Occupational Therapy – Occupational Therapists work across the Trust, supporting people of all ages who have many kinds of mental health problems. Occupational therapy is a profession that enables people with mental and physical health needs to maintain and develop the skills and abilities they need to lead independent and satisfying lives.

Physiotherapy – Our physiotherapists provide a service for older people who have mental health problems and adults who have learning disabilities and complex health needs. The team have many ways to help someone improve their physical health, mobility and movement.

Psychology – Our psychologists work across the Trust, supporting people of all ages who have many kinds of mental health problems or psychological issues. Psychologists look at people, the mind, and behaviours. Through this, they can learn how to help improve someone’s mental health and psychological well-being.

Speech and Language Therapy – Our speech and language therapists see people with learning disabilities who are receiving community or inpatient support and have either communication or eating, drinking, and swallowing difficulties. They also see older people with eating, drinking and swallowing difficulties who are inpatients at Edward Street Hospital.

We support people aged 18 years and above who are experiencing both common and severe mental health difficulties. We provide services within hospital and community facilities, as well as within people’s own homes, across Sandwell and Wolverhampton.

For those aged over 65 in our community we provide a mix of in-patient and community care. A brief description of who our in-patient and community-based teams support can be found below, and you can read more about them all by clicking on the link to their individual pages.

In-patient Care

Edward Street Hospital – The teams at Edward Street Hospital give 24-hour care and support to older people from Sandwell with mental health needs such as dementia, depression, and anxiety.

Penn Hospital - One of the wards at Penn Hospital provides 24 hour care to older people from Wolverhampton with a range of mental health needs.

Community-based Care

Community Mental Health Teams – We have six community teams for older adults. There are three in Sandwell covering Rowley Regis and Tipton, Smethwick and Oldbury, and Wednesbury and West Bromwich. The three Wolverhampton teams cover the North, South East and South West of the city.

Sandwell Memory Assessment Service – We offer a comprehensive assessment service for all people with memory problems.

Mental Health Liaison Nursing Service – This service helps older people who have mental health needs and are being cared for in Sandwell District General Hospital.

Therapy and Recovery Outreach Service – This service is for people who are already using mental health services and have a mental health problem that affects their daily living.

Therapy and Recovery Unit – This service is for adults aged sixty-five and over who have mental health needs.

Wolverhampton Memory Assessment Service - We offer assessment and possible treatment for older people experiencing a specific type of memory problem.

Wolverhampton Older People’s Liaison Team - This service is for older people who have been admitted to Accident & Emergency, acute and rehabilitation wards within New Cross and West Park Hospitals.

Wolverhampton Older People’s Home Treatment Team - This service is for older people going through severe mental health crises who can benefit from an treatment at home rather than in hospital.

These services are for people aged 18 to 65. We provide services in inpatient settings, such as hospitals and rehabilitation centres. We also have a number of different community–based teams that support people in their own homes.

A brief description of our in-patient and community-based services can be found below, and you can read more about them all by clicking on the link to their individual pages.

This service is for people aged 18 to 65. In the service we have one hospital, one care home, and a number of different community-based teams.

A brief description of who our in-patient and community-based teams support can be found below, and you can read more about them all by clicking on the link to their individual pages.

In-patient Care

Hallam Street Hospital – Hallam Street Hospital give intensive 24-hour in-patient care to people who need more support than we can give them in the community.

The Macarthur Centre - Supports people with severe and enduring mental health conditions who need a higher level of care and treatment than is usual in mental health rehabilitative settings.

Penn Hospital - The hospital has three different wards for men and women needing increased support with their mental health.

This service is for people aged 18 to 65. In the service we have one hospital, one care home, and a number of different community-based teams.

A brief description of who our in-patient and community-based teams support can be found below, and you can read more about them all by clicking on the link to their individual pages.

Community-based Care

Assertive Outreach Team – This team give flexible and creative support to adults who have severe and enduring mental health problems, and who are difficult to engage with mental health services.

Community Mental Health Teams – We have four Community Mental Health Teams, covering Sandwell. The teams give community support to people with severe and enduring mental health problems such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Complex Care Service - This service provides community support to people in Wolverhampton with severe and enduring mental health problems such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. 

Criminal Justice Mental Health Liaison Team– This team aims to help people who have, or may have, mental health problems and are in contact with the Criminal Justice System.

Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment Team – This service is for people going through severe mental health crises.

Early Intervention Service – This team support young people and adults aged 14 to 35 who are going through a first episode of psychosis, or who seem at risk of going through a first episode of psychosis.

Eating Disorder Service – This team gives support to people with the following eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder, and eating disorders otherwise not specified.

Mental Health Liaison Team – This team is based at the Emergency Services Centre in Sandwell Hospital. Here they can help adults attending the centre who may have mental health problems.

Wellbeing Team (page coming soon!) – This team, is based at Quayside House and covers Oldbury and Smethwick, Rowley Regis and Tipton, and Wednesbury and West Bromwich. The service offers non-urgent mental health care to people with common mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety and stress.

Wolverhampton Healthy Minds - This is a psychological therapies service for people who are experiencing common mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and stress.

We provide community healthcare services for children, young people and their families in Dudley.

We also provide a range of CAMHS (child and adolescent mental health services) in Sandwell and Wolverhampton.

These services are for children and young people aged 0 to 18 and families living in Dudley. Services are delivered in a range of settings, including schools, nurseries, children’s centres and in people’s homes.

We provide a range of services for children and young people who are experiencing mental health problems.

We are a major provider of mental health, learning disability and community healthcare services for people of all ages in the Black Country.

We provide:

  • mental health and specialist health learning disabilities services to people of all ages in Sandwell and Wolverhampton.
  • specialist learning disability services in Walsall, Wolverhampton and Dudley
  • community healthcare services for children, young people and families in Dudley

There are over 2000 staff working in our Trust. Our staff carry out a wide range of roles, working together to provide integrated care and support to all those using our services. Frontline staff working in the trust include:

  • mental health nurses
  • psychiatrists
  • social workers
  • healthcare support workers
  • health visitors
  • school nurses
  • allied health professionals (such as psychologists, occupational therapists, and speech and language therapists).

You can read in more detail about these, and other, roles by clicking here. You can find out more about working for the Trust, including current vacancies, by clicking here.

As a public body, we are accountable to the people we serve. The Trust Board is responsible for determining the strategy and overall direction of the Trust in an open, honest, and transparent manner. You can read up on the members of the Board and look through minutes from Board meetings by clicking here.

We’re using our position as an NHS Foundation Trust to strengthen our ties with the local community. We have a large and growing membership, and we’re always encouraging people to join our Trust as members. Members are kept informed of what is happening in the Trust, and their advice is sought on ways we can improve the effectiveness and responsiveness of our services.

Our membership can also help us champion the importance of good health and well-being to the wider public. To read more about becoming involved with the Trust, click here. Our members also elect the public constituency of the Assembly of Governors. The Assembly meets on a regular basis to hear about and discuss developments in the Trust. These meetings are open to the public. Click here to consult minutes from Assembly meetings and to read about the Assembly of Governors.

In this section of the website, you can find out more about our Trust: what we do and where we work.

As a public body, we are accountable to the people we serve.  The Board of Directors is responsible for determining the strategy and overall direction of the Trust in an open, honest, and transparent manner. The Board is made up of a balance of executive and non-executive directors.

The Board meet on a monthly basis and all meetings are open to the public. The Chair leads the Board in its primary duties of:

  • Setting the strategic direction of the organisation

  • Ensuring compliance with its licence and other legal obligations

  • Overseeing the delivery of planned results by monitoring performance against objectives and ensuring corrective action is taken when necessary

  • Ensuring the quality and safety of the services provided by the Trust

  • Ensuring services are provided in an effective, efficient and economical manner

  • Setting the vision and values of the Trust and standards of conduct for Governors, members of the Board of Directors and other very senior management

  • Ensuring a sound framework of internal control and risk management is in place 

In this section of the website, you can meet the Board members and browse Board meeting papers.

We are committed to promoting equality, diversity, inclusion and human rights, both in the services we provide and as an employer. We know that social inequalities and social exclusion can have a harmful effect on the lives of people using our services and the lives of people working for us. We also have a legal duty to ensure equality in our services and as an employer.

 

What do we mean by diversity?

The Black Country is an ethnically diverse area made up of many different people from many different cultures, communities, and backgrounds. Being responsive to the diverse range of people in the Black Country is a responsibility we take very seriously. We want to provide person-centred, accessible, and effective services for all people. We wouldn’t be able to do this without being sensitive to the different needs that different people have.

 

What do we mean by equality?

For us, equality means fair treatment and equal opportunities. We work hard to make our services accessible to the people who need our support, regardless of their personal circumstances. We also make sure that no-one using our services receives a lower standard of care and support than someone else simply because of who they are. Making sure that all our staff members are treated fairly is just as important to us.

This principle of fair treatment and equal opportunities applies to everyone. Many groups of people may find themselves disadvantaged or may experience discrimination. People most often face discrimination in one or more of the following 9 areas, now known as protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010:

  • Age
  • Disability
  • Gender Re-assignment
  • Marriage & Civil Partnership
  • Pregnancy & Maternity
  • Race
  • Religion or Belief
  • Sex
  • Sexual Orientation

 

What do we mean by inclusion?

Inclusion is about the practice of ensuring that people feel they belong, are engaged, and connected. 

 

What do we mean by human rights?

Human Rights are the rights that everybody has. Examples of human rights are the right to healthcare or work or education. In teh NHS we want to promote the principles of human rights known as FREDA which stands for: Fairness, Respect, Equality, Dignity, Autonomy. These principles are reflected in the Trust values as well as our Equality Strategy which is called Play Fair. 

 

NHS Equality Delivery System 2

The NHS has a way of measuring its performance around equality and diversity and ensuring that we are doing all we can to reduce health inequalities. The NHS Equality Delivery System (EDS2) is a framework to help Trusts to assess and improve our work around equality. It also helps organisations to meet the requirements of the public sector equality duties in the Equality Act 2010, and to ensure that we are consulting with and involving those who use our services as the Trust develops.

The EDS2 has 4 main goals:

  • Better health outcomes for all
  • Improved patient access and experience
  • A representative and supported workforce
  • Inclusive leadership

The EDS2 supports compliance of our statutory specific duty to develop and publish equality information and equality objectives. Our current equality objectives are part of ‘Play Fair’ our Trust equality strategy. Read more about how we created ‘Play Fair’ and view the objectives we set ourselves by clicking on Equality Strategy and Objectives below.

During August 2016, work on EDS2 moved forwards in a major way. EDS2 is a tool to help Trusts meet their PSED. There are various stages to the process and one of them is gathering evidence from services and departments across the Trust to help us then work with stakeholders to grade our equality performance and work out where we are doing well and where we need to improve. An audit tool was created and 20 services from across the Trust (a good mix from different areas) responded. Information was compiled into a Trust-wide summary which was shared with local stakeholders. This included the building of some really positive links with Sandwell College Health students, working with the Carers Team and also liaising with one of our Public Governors. Clinical Groups can look in detail at the evidence gathered from their different services to look at how they use the information to help meet their local objectives. The EDS2 summary is now available to view below and was submitted to NHS England.. We have now used the evidence gathered to establish where our work priorities need to be over the next 1 year and have created our new Equality Objectives mentioned above.

You can refer to the pdf EDS2 Summary document. During the winter of 2019, we will begin the EDS2 process again.

 

Workforce Race Equality Standard (WRES)

The WRES is a new national mandatory standard for the NHS that became part of the NHS Standard Contract from April 2015 The WRES, for the first time, requires organisations to demonstrate progress against a number of indicators of workforce equality, including a specific indicator to address the low levels of Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) Board representation.

There are nine metrics. Four of the metrics are specifically on workforce data and four of the metrics are based on data derived from the national NHS Staff Survey indicators. The latter will highlight any differences between the experience and treatment of White staff and BME staff in the NHS, with a view to closing the gaps highlighted by those metrics. The final metric requires provider organisations to ensure that their Boards are broadly representative of the communities they serve.

pdf Click here to see our completed WRES template for 15-16. pdf Click here to see our Trust WRES action plan which gives detail on what we have done, are in process of doing and what we are planning to do around race equality and the workforce. This action plan will be monitored and updated by our Trust Equalities & Inclusion Board and has also had involvement from our BME Staff Network.

To see our completed WRES documents for 2018 - 2019, please select from the following: pdf WRES in brief 2019 spreadsheet WRES Submission Template for 2018 - 2019 pdf WRES Report 2019

Click here to view a short video on WRES by NHS England, explaining the need for WRES within the NHS.

 

The Workforce Disability Equality Standard (WDES)

The Workforce Disability Equality Standard (WDES) is a set of specific measures (metrics) that will enable NHS trusts to compare the experiences of disabled and non-disabled staff. This information will be used by trusts to develop local action plans, and demonstrate progress against the indicators of disability equality. The Workforce Disability Equality Standard (WDES) has a set of ten specific measures (Metrics) NHS organisations will use the Metrics data and local data to develop their local action plan this will; enable the Trust to demonstrate progress against the indicators of disability equality. The WDES has been commissioned by the Equality and Diversity Council (EDC) and developed through a pilot and extensive engagement with NHS Trusts and key stakeholders. It is mandated through the NHS Standard Contract and is restricted to NHS Trusts and Foundation Trusts for the first two years of implementation.

 

Making a difference for disabled staff

The WDES is important, because research shows that a motivated, included and valued workforce helps to deliver high quality patient care, increased patient satisfaction and improved patient safety. The implementation of the WDES will enable NHS Trusts and Foundation Trusts to better understand the experiences of their Disabled staff. It will support positive change for existing employees and enable a more inclusive environment for Disabled people working in the NHS. It will also allow us to identify good practice.

 

WDES Action Group

Through the implementation of the WDES the Trust has established the WDES Action Group that meets on a bi-monthly basis to review the progress of the WDES Action Plan and support the Trust in promoting disability awareness.

 

WDES Progress

spreadsheet WDES Return Submission Template 2018 - 2019

pdf WDES Report 2019

 

Gender pay gap

Below is the Trust's gender pay pay report, using a snapshot of data on March 31st, 2017 and the action plan the Trust is following to close gaps where they arise:

pdf Gender Pay Gap report

 

The Modern Slavery Act (MSA) 2015

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires organisations to be transparent about their efforts to eradicate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chain.

The principal activities of the Trust is the provision of healthcare services, specialising in Mental Health (MH) Learning Disabilities and Children & Young People's care, across the Black Country. Our supply chain includes procurement of  staff, medical services, medical, pharmaceutical and other consumables, facilities maintenance, utilities and waste management. The Trust is committed to ensuring that there is no modern slavery or human trafficking in our supply chains or in any part of our business. The Trust is developing policies and procedures to reflect our commitment to acting ethically in all our business relationships and to implement effective systems and controls to ensure slavery and human trafficking is not taking place in our supply chains. Training is provided to those involved in the supply chain and the rest of the organisation as part of the Trust's safeguarding role.

The Trust will work to identify and mitigate risk and put in place contractual terms which will allow the Trust to gain assurance that slavery and human trafficking have no place in our business. The Trust will work with suppliers to ensure that they treat their obligations towards modern slavery with the same importance that we do.

Download leaflets in different languages on MSA 2105: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-victims-of-human-trafficking

pdf Download English language MSA 2015 information leaflet .

 

Find out more

By clicking on the links below you can view some of the information we are gathering and analysing. You can find out why we do Equality Impact Assessments (EqIAs), and see some examples from across our services and workforce. You can also read 'Play Fair' our Equality Strategy to discover how we put the principles of equality, diversity, inclusion and human rights into practice.

Please contact the Equality and Diversity Team on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

 

We are a major provider of mental health, learning disability and community healthcare services for people of all ages in the Black Country.

We provide:

  • mental health and specialist health learning disabilities services to people of all ages in Sandwell and Wolverhampton.
  • specialist learning disability services in Walsall, Wolverhampton, Dudley and Sandwell
  • community healthcare services for children, young people and families in Dudley

There are over 2000 staff working in our Trust. Our staff carry out a wide range of roles, working together to provide integrated care and support to all those using our services. Frontline staff working in the trust include:

  • mental health nurses
  • psychiatrists
  • social workers
  • healthcare support workers
  • health visitors
  • school nurses
  • allied health professionals (such as psychologists, occupational therapists, and speech and language therapists).

You can read more about these, and other, roles by clicking here. You can find out more about working for the Trust, including current vacancies, by clicking here.

As a public body, we are accountable to the people we serve. The Trust Board is responsible for determining the strategy and overall direction of the Trust in an open, honest, and transparent manner. You can read up on the members of the Board and look through minutes from Board meetings by  clicking here.

We’re using our position as an NHS Foundation Trust to strengthen our ties with the local community. We have a large and growing membership, and we’re always encouraging people to join our Trust as members. Members are kept informed of what is happening in the Trust, and their advice is sought on ways we can improve the effectiveness and responsiveness of our services.  Our membership can also help us champion the importance of good health and well-being to the wider public. To read more about becoming involved with the Trust, click here.

Our members also elect the public constituency of the Assembly of Governors. The Assembly meets on a regular basis to hear about and discuss developments in the Trust. These meetings are open to the public. Click here to consult minutes from Assembly meetings and to read about the Assembly of Governors.

In this section of the website, you can find out more about our Trust: what we do and where we work.

At the heart of being a Foundation Trust is local accountability. Governors have a pivotal role to play here. Governors are elected by members of the Trust or appointed to represent stakeholder organisations. They are the individuals that bind a trust to its patients, service users, staff, and stakeholders.

Our Assembly of Governors is made up of:

  • 22 members of the public
  • 7 members of staff
  • 7 people appointed by recognised stakeholder organisations.


Anyone who is a member of the Trust and over 16 years of age can become a public governor.

The general duties of the Assembly are to hold non-executive directors individually and collectively to account for the performance of the Board of Directors and to represent the interests of the members of the Trust as a whole, and the interests of the public.

In addition it has a number of other statutory duties, including:

  • appointing and dismissing the Chair and Non-Executive directors
  • determining the remuneration and terms and conditions of the Chair and Non-Executive directors
  • appointing and terminating the Auditor
  • approving the appointment of Chief Executive
  • receiving the Annual Report and Accounts
  • reviewing the forward plan as presented by the Board of Directors


In addition to their statutory duties, governors oversee the Trust’s membership strategy, ensuring representation and engagement levels are maintained and increased as appropriate. Governors keep a check on performance through such means as asking to receive documents produced by the Board, and requesting information updates from the Board. Governors are responsible for regularly feeding back information about the Trust’s vision and performance to the constituencies or stakeholder organisations they are representing.

Below is a link to a page containing published papers and minutes from past meetings of the Assembly. There is also a link to a page containing the Registers of Interest for each governor.

It is widely acknowledged that CO2 (carbon) emissions have, and will continue to have, a harmful impact on the environment in which we live. This, in turn, has a harmful impact on the country’s health and wellbeing. As an NHS body with the objective of improving health, it is clear that we have a responsibility to do as much as we can to reduce carbon emissions and improve the health prospects of future generations.

The Government has introduced laws to ensure the country as a whole takes positive action to reduce carbon usage (often referred to as a carbon footprint). The Department of Health has published its own strategy to help the NHS, a major contributor to current CO2 emissions, cut its emissions by at least 10% by 2015.

In our Annual Plan for 2009/10 we committed ourselves to developing a strategy which would lead to reduced CO2 emissions. To help us, we entered into partnership with the Carbon Trust, a government-sponsored company with significant expertise in reducing CO2 emissions. This strategy will be completed in Spring 2010.

In this area of the website you can get to know us better by flicking through PDF versions of Grapevine, our bi-monthly newsletter for staff, members, service users, carers, and anyone else who wants a read. You can also look through our past press releases.

We also use social media to keep in touch with people. You can find out more about how we use social media by clicking the link below.

For all press enquiries please contact the Marketing and Communications Team on 0121-612-8032 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Safeguarding is about protecting people from abuse and neglect, and ensuring people get safe and effective care. Abuse is when somebody inflicts harm on someone else, either physically or emotionally, or both. Neglect is when someone’s physical needs, such as for adequate food, shelter, and clothing, or someone’s emotional needs are not met.

Both adults and children can suffer abuse and neglect. We are committed to preventing the abuse and neglect of both young people and adults.

On this page you'll be able to find out what's going on around the Trust and catch up on all the latest Trust news.

Welcome to the Freedom of Information section of our website. This section is designed to meet our requirements under Section 19 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 which states we have a legal duty to adopt and maintain a Freedom of Information Publication Scheme.

In addition to providing a publication scheme the Freedom of Information Act gives you the legal power to request any information that the Trust holds, this may be minutes of meetings, access to services requirements or how the Trust has spent money.

The purpose of the Act is to promote greater openness in public authorities. The Publication Scheme helps people to find all the information that we publish.

If you are looking for a specific piece of information about the Trust or about yourself this section will also provide the contact details and explain how you can gain access to certain types of information.

Our Publication Scheme is broken down in to the different Classes of Information.

Our Disclosure Log provides a list of common freedom of information requests that the Trust receives and the information that has been released in relation to these requests. 

For further information about Freedom of Information please see our Frequently Asked Questions  section.

These pages can be of help if:

The Service Experience Desk (SED) is available in all NHS Trusts. The idea behind SED is that people using an NHS service, and their carers and relatives, can turn to a confidential service who are able to listen and offer advice. If you would like to make a complaint, concern, comment or compliment, please use our online form below. By sharing your concerns, you can help improve the service for you and others.

What SED do

  • Provide a confidential service
  • Look into any concerns raised as soon as possible
  • Offer information and advice about our own and other NHS services, as well as local and national support groups
  • Receive compliments and pass them on to staff to help promote good practice
  • If any SED concern is not resolved within three working days, then the team will ensure that the patient or relative will be given the opportunity to have the matter escalated to a formal complaint, if required.

Getting in touch with SED

There are a number of ways you can get in touch with SED. You can write to (no stamp needed):

Freepost RSRA-TLAX-ETUU
Service Experience Desk
Dudley and Walsall Mental Health
2nd Floor
Trafalgar House
Dudley
DY2 8PS

Freephone: 0800 587 7720

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Or fill out the SED online form by clicking here.

Mental health, like many other areas in health, can be very confusing: full of off-putting medical terms and unusual sounding conditions. However, mental health problems are very common, with 1 in 4 of us likely to experience mental health problems each year. There are many different types of mental health problems. To find out more about these problems visit our page Understanding Mental Health Conditions.

To try and get to grips with the language of mental health you might want to visit our page Understanding Mental Health Jargon. This page explains some of the words and phrases commonly used in mental health.

There are also a number of websites that are very helpful on the topic of mental health generally. These include: 

Advocacy is a way of supporting people to make sure their voices are heard and their needs are met. Advocates help people express their opinions, make their own informed choices, and exercise their rights. Advocates are independent from our Trust. They are non-judgmental and confidential, and will only act on the wishes of the person they are advocating for.

We work closely with several advocacy organisations:

One Voice – We provide a voice advocacy service for service users in Wolverhampton.

Regent House
Bath Avenue
Wolverhampton
WV1 4EG
Tel: 01902 810016
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

POhWER – We provide a voice advocacy service for service users in Dudley, Walsall and Sandwell.

PO Box 14043
Birmingham
B6 9BL
Tel: 0300 456 2370

VoiceAbility –We run an Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA) service for Dudley, Walsall, Wolverhampton and Sandwell. We also provide advocacy services for informal patients at Hallam Street Hospital in Sandwell and Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy (IMCA) for people in Walsall, Wolverhampton and Sandwell.

Tel: 01902 255 015
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

You can read more about Voice Advocacy by clicking here, and more about Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA) and Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy (IMCA) by clicking here. Changing Our Lives are an independent self-advocacy organisation. They carry out Quality of Life Audits for our services for people with learning disabilities. Read more about Changing Our Lives by clicking here.
 
There are a number of other advocacy organisations working across the Black Country that may be of help. These include:
 
  • Sandwell Advocacy - Provide a free, confidential, and independent advocacy support to people who find it difficult to say and get what they want and need. 
  • Rethink Mental Illness - Citizen advocacy scheme matching volunteer advocates with people with mental health problems. Advocates provide help with exploring options and choices and representing views.

What is wellbeing? How do we find wellbeing? These are questions that people have been asking themselves for a long time. Quite recently, there has been a great deal of scientific interest in what ‘wellbeing’ is. What the scientists have found will probably not be a surprise to anyone. Wellbeing, loosely speaking, is our sense of how well our lives are going. We feel our lives are going well when we:

  • have a sense of individual vitality
  • take part in activities that are meaningful, engaging, and which make us feel competent and in charge of our lives
  • have a stock of inner resources that help us to cope when things go wrong and be resilient to changes beyond our immediate control

These are things that require work and investment on our part. There are five things we can begin doing right away, in order to increase our wellbeing and the wellbeing of the people around us.

Our vision is to improve health and well-being for people across the Black Country, providing a range of specialist health services for people with learning disabilities and mental health issues across the region.

These services provide specialist health care to adults, including autistic spectrum disorders, mental health difficulties and behaviour problems with a team of specialist health staff providing a range of in-patient treatments and interventions.

A description of our in-patient care is given below, together with our referral process and bed availability information enabling commissioners and other interested individuals to identify capacity enabling an appropriate and efficient referral.

Bed availability is updated each working day at approximately 4pm. The availability figures can change throughout the day and at weekends, so please contact the facility directly if the availability is showing as zero, as a bed may become available before the database is updated.

Forensic Rehabilitation

larches landing
The Larches
The Larches provides specialist forensic rehabilitation for up to 14 men with a learning disability either stepping down from secure service or stepping up from inpatient / community based services.
- 14 beds
- Male facility
- Age 18+
ppines landing
The Pines
The Pines provides specialist rehabilitation for up to four women whose primary needs are best met by a forensic learning disability service. They may also have co-existing mental health difficulties and/or autism.
- 4 beds
- Female Facility
- Age 18+

Assessment / Treatment

Orchard Hills
We'll be popping some pertinent facts about the service here, right?
Penrose House
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Ridge Hill
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NHS England Managed

Gerry Simon
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